Tag Archives: wealthy

Don’t use a credit card? You could be funding the wealthy.

There is so much debate today over the disparity of wealth. Roughly 1% of the population holds 20% of nation’s wealth and 20% of the top wealthy own 80% of nation’s wealth, leaving only 20 percent of the wealth for the rest of the 80% of the population. Confused? That’s their plan.

But an interesting report emerged saying that using credit cards actually supports the wealthy. No, banks aren’t just giving money to the rich…That would be wealthy welfare. No this is happening at retailers where you shop every day.

Retailers must pay credit card fees to the bank. Instead of taking the loss, retailers jack up prices to incur credit card fees. So as per the article, if you pay with cash you are helping to pay credit card fees. So even if you want to avoid credit cards you are paying for other people to use them. 

How does this benefit the rich? Well the statistics show the wealthy spend more on credit cards and more often. They use their cards to receive rewards and that’s right – cash back (what you work so hard to earn)

 So next time you’re shopping toss in a few coins for the rich and not needy to support wealthy welfare. They of course are nothing without us measly peasants.

Disaster and Tax Cuts for Businesses and the Rich.

Oh woe is me! People are STILL whining about Oregon’s decision to increase taxes of businesses and the wealthy. First let me remind the world, reducing taxes of businesses and the rich was the practice for nearly 30 years and it failed. Our economy nearly collapsed giving tax breaks to corporations and the rich.

Personally I find if businesses act irresponsibly, or incompetent they should not blame to government. Those business owners should perhaps pack up shop and get a real job like the rest of us. Don’t blame the government if you’re a lousy business person. But I digress…

 Last night after reading comments from a man who I thought of rational mind and intelligence I thought of Theodore Roosevelt’s quote.

 “This country will not be a permanently good place for any of us to live in unless we make it a reasonably good place for all of us to live in.”

At some point in America we forgot what it is meant to be united and civil. And my point was proven last week during “Snowmagedon”

Last week was a perfect example of our crumbling infrastructure, business irresponsibility and personal lack of civility.  Our federal government shut down for a couple feet of snow. The same amount of snow falls upon the Kremlin yearly and the Russian government never closes. Snow brought down power lines, halted transportation and collapsed buildings. Maybe if Americans cared more for society as whole rather than material and superficial needs, perhaps many would not have been without power or gone hungry.

I also wandered last night what would happen in the United States in the event of a real threatening emergency. We flew immediately to help those in Haiti but we’ll condemn and strike our neighbor for an unshoveled walkway or stolen parking space. What would happen if we truly suffered a disaster? Are we prepared and united to help each other through tough times?

Bur we are okay and sold a nasty bill of goods that lowering taxes and cutting essential programs is good. Good for who? What will happen in the event of disaster when we have cut police and emergency crews?  Who is going to be there to help if were cutting back on those who provide us safety. If we continue to cut taxes that pay police and emergency crews, we cannot complain when they don’t respond when we need them. And finally, do you really, really, really think corporate CEO is going to care for our safety. No. when disaster strikes they will be the first to flee. They will be on their private jets away from the disaster. So, let us stop putting businessmen and CEO’s on the top of that proverbial pedestal.

So during this week of random acts of kindness let’s put aside bitter differences for the common good and support those whose job is to take care of us. Let’s realize that we are very fortunate to live in such a country of abundance and pay a little bit of dues for the common good.